Sunday, December 1, 2013

Amazon Promises Half-Hour Shipping By Drone

On Sunday night, Jeff Bezos revealed that Amazon is working on drones that can deliver packages up to five pounds, to your house in less than half an hour.

Saturday, November 23, 2013

If The Cops Pull You Over, These Are Your Rights



When we heard about a New Mexico man's nightmarish traffic stop, we wondered what rights you actually have when you get pulled over.

We talked to Martin Kron, a New York traffic attorney and former traffic court judge, and his son, attorney Daniel Kron, about your rights on the road.

Police can't pull you over without probable cause.

Cops can't just randomly stop you and look for drugs in your car. They need a reason, or "probable cause," like speeding or a broken tail light.

Let's say you are speeding, the police do pull you over, and they do find drugs in your car. But let's say the officer wants to give you a break and forgoes a speeding ticket. Cops don't need to ticket you for speeding to provide probable cause for the stop in court; their notes from the situation would provide enough evidence.

"It's not enough to just not have a ticket as proof. The officer would have had to fail to write it in his narrative," Daniel Kron said.

You don't have to pull over until you can do so safely.

You should still pull over when you can do so safely, Martin Kron said. And if you can't, you should notify the officer with a hand signal and drive the speed limit.

"The sooner, the better though. Don't upset the officer. Sometimes you might end up with three tickets instead of one," he added, implying officers might look for extra infractions if you made them angry.

You have the right to stay in your car.


"It's perfectly legal for you to say in the vehicle, but doing so looks bad to the officer," Martin Kron said.

Officers often ask people to "step out of the car" as a safety precaution — to make sure the driver doesn't have any concealed weapons. But it's probably best to get out of the car to avoid a tense situation.

It's not a good idea, but you can refuse a breathalyzer.

Most states, including New York, have a statute called "implied consent." When you get your driver's license, you agree to a breathalyzer when pulled over. You can technically still refuse a breathalyzer, but in many states you could get your license suspended for six months if you do.

Now, if police suspect you of drug use, the protocol changes. Based on probable cause, the officer can take you back to the station for either a blood test or analysis from a drug recognition expert, according to Martin Kron.

You are required to stop at checkpoints.

Yes, drivers do have to stop at checkpoints. Police departments plan checkpoints ahead of time, but they must have a specific plan, such as stopping every third car (or every car), according to Martin Kron.

Cops can only search your car without a warrant for these 5 reasons.

1) If you consent, police naturally have a right to search your car.

2) "Plain view" also gives an officer the okay to search your car. "If an officer approaches your car and on the passenger seat he notices a baggie of marijuana ... based on regular activities — meaning he doesn't have to search too hard" then the pot is considered to be in plain view, Daniel Kron said.

3) The third reason is "search incident to arrest," according to Daniel Kron. Basically, if an officer arrests you with probable cause, he or she can then search your vehicle.

4) Your car can be searched if an "officer has probable cause to suspect a crime," Daniel Kron said. For example, it's not illegal to have blood on your front seats, to have a black eye, or to have a ripped-up purse in the car. But all those things in conjunction could be suspicious to an officer.

5) Lastly, "exigent circumstances," allow a warrantless search. Before an officer receives a warrant, he can "break every rule if he suspects the evidence is about to be destroyed," Daniel Kron said.

This happens more often in specific locations, like residences, instead of vehicles. For example, if the police want to conduct a drug search and they hear a toilet flush, they can reasonably enter your home, Daniel noted.

You have to let the cops search your car if they have a warrant.

You have to let them search your car if they have a warrant, but some limits apply to the areas they can search.

"If a police officer believes you have a gun in your vehicle, he's not allowed to search in an area too small to hold it," Daniel Kron noted. In that case, the glove box may be fair game but not the cigarette lighter.

Even if police find something incriminating the warrant didn't stipulate — like drugs in the glove box while looking for a gun — the "plain sight" exception applies. They'll still charge you.

Sunday, November 17, 2013

4 Sex Positions Every Man Should Try



It’s simple for men to reach orgasmm but for her to reach the big O? Count the ways. According to the latest research published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, vaginal and clitoral orgasms are, in fact, separate sensations.

Don’t obsess over the source of her pleasure, though—just try something new. Interest in testing out new positions actually makes a big difference in her pleasure and her arousal, explains Jen Landa, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of BodyLogicMD and author of The Sex Drive Solution for Women.

Whether your goal is to give her a blended orgasm or target her G-spot, focus on vaginal pleasure or hone in on her clitoris, we’ve rounded up four positions that will help you perform like a pro in between the sheets.



The Pretzel

Kneel and straddle her left leg while she’s lying on her left side. From here, she should bend her right leg around the right side of your waist—allowing full access to her vagina. This position is an upgrade from standard missionary because this sets you up for deeper penetration and allows you to slow your roll. “Most women find sex much more pleasurable when it’s not just constant thrusting,” says Landa. So spend some time exploring her body. This setup gives you complete access to her clitoris for manual stimulation. But don’t feel limited to solely hands on fun. Try withdrawing your penis and, while holding the shaft with your left hand, rub the head against her clitoris. Start out soft and slow, then as you increase speed and pressure, reinsert once you’ve brought her to the brink of an orgasm.



The Standing Dragon

Position her on the edge of the bed, posing on all fours. As you stand behind her, have her arch her back so it lifts her butt upward. With your legs outside of hers, use your thighs to squeeze her knees together, which tightens her vagina around your penis. This position is ideal for G-spot stimulation and also gives you a great view of her curves.




The Flatiron a.k.a. Downward Dog

Have her lie face down on the bed with her knees slightly bent and hips slightly raised. For comfort, and to increase the angle of her hips, you can suggest placing a pillow under her lower abs. From here, enter her from behind and keep your weight off of her by propping yourself up with your arms. This position creates a snug fit—which intensifies her pleasure by making you feel larger to her.



The Pole Position

Lie on your back and bend one of your legs, keeping the other outstretched. Have her straddle the raised leg with a thigh on either side and then lower herself onto your member so that her back is facing you. From here, she should hold your knee and use it for support as she rocks up and down. “This position is great, because it’s a lot like the reverse cowgirl, but with a twist,” says Landa. Raising your knee allows her to rub against your thigh—which produces optimal clitoral stimulation, says Landa.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

An Ex-Cop's Guide to Not Getting Arrested



Dale Carson is a defense attorney in Jacksonville, Florida, as well as an alumnus of the Miami-Dade Police Department and the FBI. So he knows a thing or two about how cops determine who to hassle, and what all of us can do to not be one of those people. Carson has distilled his tips into a book titled Arrest-Proof Yourself, now in its second edition. It is a legitimately scary book—369 pages of insight on the many ways police officers profile and harass the people on their beat in an effort to rack up as many arrests as possible.

"Law enforcement officers now are part of the revenue gathering system," Carson tells me in a phone interview. "The ranks of cops are young and competitive, they’re in competition with one another and intra-departmentally. It becomes a game. Policing isn’t about keeping streets safe, it’s about statistical success. The question for them is, Who can put the most people in jail?"

Which would make the question for you and me, how can we stay out of jail? Carson's book does a pretty good job of explaining—in frank language—how to beat a system that's increasingly predatory.

Be Invisible to Police

Carson has four golden rules, the first of which is, "If police can't see you, they can't arrest you." The simplest application of this concept is that if you plan on doing something illegal, you should do it in the privacy of your home. Yes, you can be arrested while at home, but you can't be profiled sitting in your living room, and profiling is what you're trying to avoid.

The rule extends to activities that are perfectly legal. "In 21st century America," he writes, "as long as you're not committing a crime, you should be able to wear the wildest clothes you want, roam the streets when you feel like it, and lean on a light post or hang out at some wild club if it amuses you." "Should" is the key word. In reality, cops love hassling people who stand out, even though it's not illegal to, say, have a Buckeyes bumper sticker that looks like a pot leaf. If you drive a sports car or a lowrider, you're more likely to attract a cop's attention than if you drive, say, a gray Honda Civic. Same goes for clothes, hairstyles, tone and volume of voice. Be boring. 

So try to blend in. Beat cops who patrol the same routes day after day are "incredibly attuned to incongruity." But don't be too reactive when you see cops. "Police are visual predators," Carson writes. "Any sudden change in motion, speed, direction or behavior immediately attracts their attention." That means even if you're doing something you think might attract a cop's attention, quickly doing something else will attract even more attention. "Don't alter the pattern," Carson advises. "Keep on keeping on."

Also, if you can help it, don't go out after dark.

What if I can't be invisible to police?

 If police want to hassle you, they're going to, even if you're following the above tips as closely as possible. What then? Every interaction with a police officer entails two contests: One for "psychological dominance" and one for "custody of your body." Carson advises giving in on the first contest in order to win the second. Is that belittling? Of course. "Being questioned by police is insulting," Carson writes. "It is, however, less insulting than being arrested. What I'm advising you to do when questioned by police is pocket the insult. This is difficult and emotionally painful."

Make eye contact, but don't smile. "Cops don't like smiles."

Winning the psychological battle requires you to be honest with cops, polite, respectful, and resistant to incitement. "If cops lean into your space and blast you with coffee-and-stale-donut breath, ignore it," Carson writes. Same goes for if they poke you in the chest or use racial slurs. "If you react, you'll get busted." Make eye contact, but don't smile. "Cops don't like smiles." Always tell the truth. "Lying is complicated, telling the truth is simple."

He also says you should be dignified—unless it looks like you're about to lose both the psychological contest and the one for custody of your body. In which case, you should be strategically pitiful.

First off, you should ask for a notice to appear as an alternative to being arrested. You still have to go before a judge, but you can go under your own power without first going to jail. Carson says the least degrading way to get a cop to issue you a notice in lieu of arresting you is to tell them that you're not a hardened criminal and that being arrested (and having your mugshot taken) is going to impact your employment, education and/or family.

 And if that doesn't work? It's debasement time. Start with crying. Bawl hard while begging for a notice (the option here is a notice or jail, not notice/jail or getting off scot free). "Don't waste time worrying about what your friends will think," Carson says. "If they're with you, they're getting arrested too." If they're not with you, they won't know.



 If crying fails, and you're willing to do whatever it takes to not go to jail, Carson advises you to "foul yourself so that the police will consider setting you free in order not to get their cruiser nasty." Vomit on your clothes. Defecate and urinate in your pants. Then let the officers know what you've done. If they arrest you anyway, you'll get cleaned and reclothed at the jail.

Reasonable things you should never do

If you're driving too fast and see a police car up ahead, don't hit the brakes. "If you suddenly hit the brakes," Carson writes, "cops in front of you will see your front end dip, a tip-off that you were speeding." Don't drive perfectly, or too slow. Don't slouch or put too much heavy stuff in your trunk, causing your car to ride low. If you're a dde, and you want to roll around town with your fellow dudes, be prepared for a stop. "When cops see four young males in a car, they immediately wonder if this is a crew of criminals out to do a job." If you're going to ride four deep, have one member of your car wear a highly visible item of clothing indicating what you do for a living. For instance, if you're all construction workers car-pooling on the way home from a job site, someone in the car should wear a hard hat. Seriously.

Another reasonable thing you should never do? Allow a cop to search your car. There are many loopholes that allow cops to search your car without probable cause or a warrant, but Carson advises you to say no every time. You should still follow all the rules of a traffic stop—keep hands where cops can see them, give them your paperwork, get out of the car if they ask you to—but never let them search. Always, always, always say no (politely).

Friday, October 25, 2013

Woman Kicked Out of Hotel After 9 Years



A woman who had been living at a Wisconsin hotel for nine years checked out this week after she racked up a $28,000 tab and the hotel tried to evict her.

Jana Ganjian, 64, left the Racine Marriott on her own accord, Sheriff Christopher Schmaling told ABC affiliate WISN.

The reclusive woman had tapped out her savings since moving into the Marriott after her life was turned upside down in 2004, WISN reported. Ganjian's attorney had tried to file a motion with a judge earlier this week to remain at the hotel, but the judge didn't get to it on time, prompting the eviction notice to take effect on Thursday.

"It's a cliché, I know," Ganjian told WISN. "But it feels like a nightmare to me that I can't wake from."

It was unclear where Ganjian moved to.

"I don't know where she ended up going, but she left before we had to evict her," Schmaling told WISN. Prior to Ganjian leaving, hotel staff had been working with her to help her find another place to live.

Ganjian was out of work due to a chronic illness and she moved to the hotel because they provided valuable services she could not find anywhere else, WISN reported.

When contacted by ABC News, hotel officials declined to comment on the eviction.

"As a matter of guest privacy we don't discuss details of our guests' stay," said Jeff Flaherty, senior director of corporate relations of Marriott International Inc.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Mail Carrier Saves Burning House



Most of us don’t anticipate saving a life when we head off to work each morning, but one Detroit mail carrier did just that when he prevented a woman’s house from burning down.

On Tuesday, postal worker Darrian Crutcher, 48, was making the rounds on his usual 10:30 a.m. route, when he noticed smoke billowing from the upstairs window of a home on Stansbury Street. “There was a young girl, around 12 years old, sitting on the front steps crying,” Crutcher tells Yahoo Shine. “She said her mother was inside the house, so I called 911." The dispatcher told Crutcher to make sure everyone was out of the home—and without a thought to his own safety, he walked inside and found the homeowner, Carolyn Patterson. “She was standing in the living room panicking, so I asked if she had a hose,” he says.

The hose was located on the side of the house. Crutcher raced outside to grab it, then hooked it up to the Patterson’s kitchen sink and dragged it upstairs. “I crawled on my hands and knees because the entire second floor was filled with black and gray smoke,” he says. “I had no idea where the fire was and the woman kept yelling, ‘It’s in the middle room!’ But since I had never been inside her home, I didn’t know where to go.”

The fire, which was located in the master bedroom, began when incense, left unattended, rolled off the woman’s dresser and onto the floor. Eventually, Crutcher found the room, stood up, and began spraying. “I couldn’t see, so I had no idea how close I was to the fire, but there was no time to be scared,” he says. Crutcher sprayed until he heard fire engine sirens outside. “The real guys came in and took care of the job, and I went outside to finish my route,” he says.

Once the flames were extinguished, the firefighters from Engine 30 turned their attention on Crutcher, who they hailed as a hero. “They asked me three times if I wanted a job at the fire department,” he says.

Yahoo Shine could not reach Patterson for comment. However, she told Crutcher that he was a blessing. But the mail carrier of nine years rejects his hero status. “I was there at the right time," he says. “I just did what anyone else would have done."

Saving lives seems to be the unofficial job description of postal workers these days. Earlier this month, after noticing that a mailbox on his route was filled for days with packages containing medication, Michael Wheeley, a mail carrier in Graham, North Carolina, checked on the homeowner, whom he found confined to a chair after having a stroke. Wheeley fed him and called 911.

In 2012, a mail carrier in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, stopped a man from abducting two 9-year-olds after seeing the perpetrator grab them by the necks. Because he delivered mail for the suspect, he helped police track him down. Three years ago, while delivering mail, postal worker Keith McVey of Akron, Ohio, threw down his bag and performed CPR on an unconscious man lying on the side of the road. Only two years earlier, McVey saved a girl from drowning in a lake, and years before that, he administered first aid to a suicidal teen who had jumped off a snowy bridge.


Kelly Rowland’s Biological Dad Pleads With Her To See Him





Three years ago, Solange Knowles hinted to Wonderwall that Kelly Rowland was adopted by their family and had “moved in when she was 5.” Three years later, Rowland’s estranged father of 20 years is publicly pleading to reconnect with his daughter.

67 Year old Christopher Lovett recently spoke to Radar Online on the tumultuous relationship he had with Rowland’s mother while Kelly was a child

    It wasn’t physical between me and Kelly’s mom, but there were many days and nights when Kelly would be bawling her eyes out, clutching my leg begging me, ‘Please daddy stop shouting at mummy’. That image of her howling, begging me to stop will haunt me forever.

Lovett admitted to being an abusive alcoholic and due to that he eventually left Kelly and her mother, Doris Rowland Garrison when the singer was seven years old. Lovett says he

    I just pray she comes back into my life before it’s too late.[...]I couldn’t control [the drinking and verbal abuse that Kelly witnessed]. I hoped I could make it up to her. But I’m still waiting for that day.


Lovett has tried numerous times in the past to get in contact with Kelly, which has not gone unnoticed by the Grammy award winning singer according to an interview she had with UK Cosmo in November 2011:

    He reached out to me saying he wanted to see me, but it’s unfortunate he did it so publicly. I want to meet him, and soon, I really do. I forgave him a long time ago. I haven’t seen my dad for almost 20 years. It’s nothing I want a pity party for. He left me and my mom, and I was angry. I wanted to be a daddy’s girl so bad.


Kelly previously stated she planned on seeing her father on Christmas of 2011 “because tomorrow’s not promised to us.” However, the meeting has not happened and in a September 2013 interview with Essence Magazine, Rowland has no idea why she has not yet:

    I haven’t [seen my father yet.] I don’t know what’s stopping me because I’ve had opportunities. But it really is time. I probably need to ask my therapist about it.
Kelly Rowland recently released her fourth solo album, Talk A Good Game. While Kelly had that monster multiplatinum selling single “Motivation” with Lil Wayne in 2011, none of her TAGG singles reached Gold and she has not had a Gold selling album since her debut, Simply Deep in 2002.